Tag Archives: glamping

The Heartland ​Program

We promised some exciting new plans for this year, and we have been working hard. We spent a lovely sun-bathed day putting a new yurt up in Pianella,  Abruzzo for a beautiful new campsite. This campsite is owned by one of our clients in the UK, so it was funny seeing two yurts going up at the same time in two different countries and symbolic in a way for where we are taking the Heartland rural development program, as a land bridge between the UK and the continent, sprouting new projects and sustainable rural development.

Trucks and yurts two of our greatest loves

We are attempting to steer Glamping into a new direction in earnest, and this is how the Heartland program was born. Being one of the main structure providers in the UK, has put us in a central position to influence our campsite clients and learn from them. This innovative  program is running parallel now both in Italy and in the UK. We started working with landowners, Estates, and small holdings on creating a new type of campsite, with sustainable development at heart. Kerry Roy who has become a good friend is a really good example, and we believe in her! She is the rising star of Glamping, everything this woman touches turns into gold, so keep your eyes peeled for her new Italian retreat centre! She manages the successful Camp Katur in the UK too.

Sand and green oak framed 14ft at Camp Katur

It was fun seeing yurts we made by Volunteers and in some of the transformational events we run, go up over the same week in two different countries.

As Italy is a waking market where Glamping is concerned, it has given us time to reflect and design things from the ground up, and what has started as a project aimed to build our own campsite in the mountains of Abruzzo has turned into something much bigger. We now run a full service for people wanting to set up campsites in Italy and have a list of properties we hand-pick that are gorgeous and perfect for this type of venture. We have also chosen some of the most beautiful structure providers with saunas, tents and more, alongside some local log cabin builders etc and of course let us not forget our own unique tents. This is a program that takes new owners, especially people from the UK by the hand through all the rigmaroles of setting up a newly sustainable campsite in Italy. But the success of this program has also brought up some questions for us because we work mainly in the UK.

We asked ourselves why don’t we do the same for rural areas in the UK, help land-owners and investors into a new program of rural development, help the large profile of campsites we work with move into a more sustainable route, and so the Heartland program is now coming to the UK too! Into a big and well-proven industry. So if you are a land-owner or someone wanting to set up a new site contact us for more details. If you want to take your new site along a more sustainable route we have a plug-in model that has been proven, but its also a way we can really give back to rural areas, to help preserve history and tradition, bring personal development and transformational events in integration with small scale country living.

In the meantime here are some nice photos of our yurt going up in Italy.

Kerry Roy loving her brand new yurt

 

‘Before It’s too late’

My inspiration currently is food, I’m getting really excited about the connection between old vegetables, cereal and legumes and a way of life that is being forgotten. Like you probably already know we do a lot of work in Italy with sustainable tourism. My current hero though is an American chef called, sean brock.

Hence the title (I stole it from him) – he revived the culinary traditions of the American south from the ground up, that is what I find exciting claiming them back before it disappearnd it’s too late. He didn’t just recreate the recipes which he had loved growing up, he went as far as getting people to grow old grains that were extinct, like Carolina rice, in a search after the real taste. I sometimes play with the idea of running a restaurant like that or having a company called “Real Tastes”, finding the real foods that aren’t grown anymore, growing them and making food for people from them. If you end up at my kitchen table that’s the game I play almost every day, and I think everyone should.

My Current hero (with vegetable tattoos)

What excites me about all of this is creating a way to take people into another layer, into an experience. Into the well being of the past, into the rich taste of real stripey tomatoes, black chickpeas. I mean, seriously wherever you live there have been veg, cereal pulse, cheeses, all grown or made in certain ways for hundreds of years, and it’s worth reaching for that taste, finding that old way of being, and weaving it into your life.

What I like about Sean Brook’s work is that he went after taste the wholesome way, and that inspires me. We have been working with cultivating some old Italian Varieties for the Heartland Association, mainly wheat, with the queen grain in my view being Solina, the soft and warm mountain grain of Abruzzo. You wait until you taste a homemade pasta made with this grain (don’t freak out if you can’t find any, just send us an email and we can get some sent to you).

Ancient Italian grain
Solina Harvest
Solina and Spinach pasta

I love taking our volunteers and getting them to help plant the fields, grow grain, harvest it by hand with us, plant herbs and gardens, and I love teaching them about conscious cooking, and the art of Alchemy in food.

Carrying apple cuttings from the red mother tree to be grafted unto our apples.

I am not joking you, eating from your garden is one thing, but eating ancient grains that have been grown in the mountains of central Italy for thousands of years, and getting people to learn how to cook them with magic, eating them with veg and pulses that too have molded to the people and the land over a millennia and simply sitting in front of the fire and letting all of that go in…. it’s like what the locals say about olive oil, “it’s not food, its medicine”. The olives are not only not sprayed, for the better part they have not even been picked for years, seeing no man, but the air and water are pure, and so you end up with – sun, stone. solitude, and silence, as is the olive tree lore.

Olive harvest with an Abruzzan Shepherd of the mountains.

The thing that inspires me, in all of that, is creating an experience. I am working on a new model for sustainable tourism, and developing a new type of campsite experience, and I want to make the Alchemy of conscious cooking one of its main pillars.

Along with all of that, I believe its time we take Glamping, as it’s called, into another direction, I don’t appreciate that it has become this Instagram sort of experience, I want it to be real, I want to combine 4 elements in the campsites we work to create. We already covered food, the second is obviously, open unspoiled nature, the third is the structures themselves, and I have always preferred the tribal ones, although I have seen some amazing spaces that inspire me in other directions. You can inspire people in so many ways by taking them into a setting. I loved staying at the Albergo Diffuso (scattered hotel, as in, it’s not just one building but half of the old village) of Sextantio in North of Abruzzo, it’s like living in an untouched medieval hilltown – the whole feel is 15th century, the houses are untouched and all done in an old way, the restaurant is in a castle cellar, it allows one to drift into another place, to dream..

The old rooms of Sextanio inspire a dreamlike atmosphere

The fourth pillar is inner work. My volunteers make me laugh a lot (even if I make them cry in return) but together we have made experiments in group conscious work, I am their guinea pig and they are mine, and for a spell, we experiment together in another way of being. The setting is wild Abruzzo and you can feel the old Samnite pastoral nomads walking their sheep in the air, and so we too let go and find different ways. I let them explore consciousness and they let me take them to places they haven’t been before, and we keep the process open and shared. We also run events that take people into this process on a deeper layer, and so this fourth element is the one I deem most important. A lot of it is allowing people to share more, and putting things in the centre, but the connection to weather and body and how everything communicates with itself is also important. One of the things that happen when we host for example is that it always rains when new people come, it’s like a rule, we will be enjoying months of Italian sunshine and…. boom, a newcomer and a storm. Explain it to a 21-year-old?!, but the thing is that some of them get it, so much so they kind of control the weather afterwards, so if you end up seeing some really strange weather, it isn’t climate change, it’s one of our volunteers on a wild day, Ok I’m just joking.

Group work in the Sun

I’ve seen our workers become telepathic, and all it took is putting them into the group making process, living in nature, and sharing life together in a tribal setting, they wake up at 4 am in different tents going through the same thing, later they go back living in separate countries and the same thing happens, its like for a spell they are still connected, yet after a while the spell (usually) fades.

Fire time magic and the power of being

I would like to develop this whole system into the campsites we design and work with, that’s what excites me, a framework and experience from the ground up. Lucy is also a fountain of ideas, she has endless experience types, and how to tailor them around a business plan and she makes me really laugh at some of the ideas of what she would like to see in a campsite/retreat experience.

So this is our current focus – we have started designing a whole new type of experience, and its code is going back to wholesome, to the food grown in a locality, to its history and tradition. The magic of being together in nature. I feel quite amazed that somehow all I need to do is choose a new direction and life finds me the people to work with, and suddenly there is this flow of people asking for our help to design their campsites. And here was me thinking we went against the “Glamping” stream, in that we always push for sustainability and back to earth practices. I thought most people just want to turn their campsite into a money-making machine, but I was wrong, and people find us exactly for that, so in order to help, I thought I would write the basics down, good ideas should be shared openly. I can’t say it will be a good idea for everyone but it inspires me, before it’s too late.

The Marriage of the Sacred and the Profane

Portugal 96′ Mike with his axe-pipe

With 2019 at the doorstep, we wanted to share some history with a view to a more sustainable future so in the last days of 2018 I would like to look at some of the history of nomadic tents in the UK, and the role the Alternative movement played in introducing another way of life. 

My Story starts when I decided to leave mainstream society and travel. Yet before I had even managed to immerse myself into a traveling lifestyle, I met a different kind of destination. I was Born In Israel and going to my second meeting of world travelers, taking place in a forest by the hills near Jerusalem I have met another type of travel, a journey of awareness,  I have met a group of people who practiced group consciousness work in that gathering and so just as I was about to take my first nomadic steps, those were entwined with consciousness work.

The following year, having fallen in love with an amazing Sardinian girl and spending the winter in Italy, I have decided to go to another European meeting of travelers. I and that girl have separated during the winter and we agreed to meet in the mountains of Portugal. When I got to the gathering, I met instead, the very same members of that group. The same two people who came to Israel the year before have greeted me just as I arrived, it seemed as if they were waiting for me. I say I traveled for love, as I used to call that Sardinian girl my true love (sometimes I still do), But the point is that destiny had another thing in mind for me, so I traveled for love, but I got the spirit instead, and so I entered the medicine area they were running as a service for the gathering. We treated the sick, and we worked with the healthy. It was a gathering of 3000 people so there was very little time to rest.

It was 96′ and the alternative scene and the traveling world were very different to what they are today. People used to really live on the road, groups like Spiral tribe worked trans into magic. One of our cases was a girl from the spiral tribe who had kidney failure, and the drama around her healing, and the rest of her friends and some of the strange magic that issued when they tried to take her away, were beyond anything I’ve seen, she ended up almost dying and we had to start her treatment from the beginning, but we mostly worked on ourselves while treating others, the biggest changes took place in us, a younger group of people being taught another path.

I have spent 3 months working with that group holding the medicine area for the larger gathering, in the course of that process everything changed, I have been transformed forever. I was taught psychic abilities I dont even know how to write about, and I have witnessed miracles. I left that gathering a changed person, or you may say even, that on leaving that gathering I ceased to exist as myself, There was no continuity, the person I was before had very little to do with what I became.

Photo: Portugal 96′ Mike with his axe-pipe

But the thing I want to speak about in this entry is the work itself, not the medicine work that was carried, but the journey of awareness that a group of young people took under the guidance of the members of the medicine area. A theme that was really strong in that gathering was the separate “medicines” of the different races, many people have heard about the teaching of Native Americans, or their way of life, maybe fewer know of the Chinese esoteric system, and the same for African magical belief systems.  Those are the 4 races: the white, the yellow, the red and the black. It seemed to me that what we were working out was the medicine of the white race, the medicine it has lost because unlike all other races it did not seem to have its own esoteric belief system. We wer not  just treating symptoms, we aimed to tackle the symptom of modern day preception altogether, to open up the western frame of mind, and the experiment succeeded in us.

In that gathering in Portugal we have found the key, by attempting a mass shift of awareness in the general Gathering goers, we also opened up our individual awarenesses. The secret tool so to speak is that by breaking the boundaries of separation within oneself one can take them down in others around. Things like Telepathy, thought forms moving into the manifest, weather control through feeling, and a host of other things, were made available to us, a small group of young people who never had a clue.

You may ask how is this relevant for the here and now, or even where this story is even going. This story is a sort of insight into the alternative movement, and the secrets that it explored. The problem with secrets is that they are not normally shared. All of us that have been there have certain issues talking about what we experienced in the open. We often get psychological profiling or shunned, or even because we do not want to frighten people, so we end up never talking about it. This story is an attempt to point out that parts of the traveling scene and the alternative movement, or you may call it the new age traveler scene had discovered something monumental.

The group that has taught us were all from the UK. it was now a year later, and after a spell of living back in Israel alone, and the atomic meltdown that this group suffered as a consequence of what they attempted to do, I found myself following the call for a working partner, It was as if I reached enlightenment, yet I was alone, more alone than I have ever been, because now I was also different to anyone I knew, I seemed to have been transformed on a really deep level.

I traveled to Scotland to take part in another gathering, in that gathering I have met most of the younger group that we with me in medicine area, we were all young and none of us really knew how to process the experience or even talk about it, I guess we suffered from a post-traumatic syndrome, yet because we all traveled no one really had time to reflect and arrive at some resolutions. 

I’m getting back to the motive behind this blog post now, and that is that in that gathering I met a woman, she was very tall, and she used to walk around with a brown woolen Jallabyia from Morroco, she walked barefoot in the mud and she played her violin by the fire, but what struck me most about her is the way she lived, and the tribe she belonged to from Tipi Valley (a land-based community in Wales with people living mostly in tipis) . In great contrast to the rest of that gathering where the travelers couldn’t deal with the wet wood, the midgies and smoke, they lived in a proud big tipi. Kids were running around a massive fire, and big iron skillets and pots were cooking food for all to share, whilst it felt like the rest of the gathering couldn’t deal with the harsh Scottish weather, those guys were at home, and that home, was a tent.

Here was a group that actually lived on the land year round, I fell in love with her as you may have already gathered, yet in my personal story, there is still another story, the story of the impersonal, the story of the Alternative movement. Traveling later to Tipi Valley in order to “kidnap” her so to speak from the “Indians”, in some sort of modern tribal act, and traveling the world together, we ended up coming back to live there. Bit by bit, the rest of the younger group from Portugal have followed suit and we lived in a sort of fusion of two core elements of the alternative scene, the medicine tribe, and the tipi people: The marriage of the sacred and the profane.

Photo:Tipi Valley winter of 98′ curtsey of Rik Mayes

like I said, we rarely hear about the contribution of the new age traveler scene, people who left their lives to travel like gypsies, living in benders and tipis on the land (this was before yurts were integrated), at best we hear some personal stories of magic and mystery, but more likely we usually hear of tales of failed protest and broken communities, so it is not really understood what this flare did, and where it guided mainstream society, its members now live in the terraced flat next door.

It is said that the new age traveler scene was a bricolage of beliefs with an affiliation with the oppressed, which is a good observation. So in order to shed a little light on its contribution and to share some of its core truths, I felt like I needed to write about the past. To touch a little on what we were trying to achieve, what we explored: a new way of life that had community and magic in its core. The long crystal clear nights of winter when snow lay on your tipi, and big beech fires were the only way to warm up, kids running into the stream and coming out blue from the cold, yet smiling. There is a story in Tipi Valley that Archie Lame deer came to visit when he was traveling in Europe, He told the people of Tipi Valley that they are truer to the Indian way of life than most Indians.

I belonged to the medicine people, and the woman I lived with, to the tent people. In coming together we attempted to bring those two families into one, bring them home, into a vision of living the medicine on the land. Though after a few years, the amount of profane in the community we lived it conflicted with the sacred, or you may say we have not reached a balance of the two. 

So this little family, the small tribe we were part of inside the larger community of tipi people left and started a strange life in trucks on the road, looking for a place we can root the medicine work in the land. There are endless magical stories of travel and community in that period too, the guy who brought us together in Portugal 96′ used to call it “Transfusion”, because we were coming together as a community on the road, fusing in movement. 

Having touched on some of those subjects, not so much in order to showcase, or even reveal, but as an attempt to remind us all about the role of the alternative movement and the lives it led in search for meaning, and touching a little on my journey in order to give this impersonal story a personal touch, I am trying to point out that the tents we make, the life we try to direct others into, are a result of some larger truth, the medicine way of the White race, the alternative.

Years have gone by now, and those alternative truths have been blended and watered down into the mainstream, its a sort of trade-off that we as the people who lived them underwent too in most cases. It is often argued that Margaret Thatcher killed of the new age traveling scene, but I think that as a movement it simply didn’t have a clear vision, kids were born that wanted to go to school and trying to stand tall in protest, made it clear that the alternative scene didn’t really have anything to protest about, it came out of mainstream society and it got swallowed back into it, and the tradeoff of that lifestyle resulted in us  making tents or teaching alternative lifestyles as courses, and it also gave birth to Glamping, a whole new industry, our friends run festivals, wedding hires, its as if the lifestyle got distilled into the everyday, and we have those people living in tents to thank for that, them and their love for the natural, for the tribal. 

Photo: Making yurts on the road in Tuscany

I say it was a trade-off because on some level we would have preferred to stay poor and live those two realities, we would have preferred to bring that marriage of medicine and tent living into a meaning of its own. But in a strange way, we sold off a part of the sacred so we can find a way to live in the profane. Now we all have tent making businesses, and we hold Glamping sites, yet we feel like we are selling a part of the magic instead of bringing it about in full form, as if we are selling ourselves in every tent we make, selling our fire, the tears that we cried by them, or worst still, we feel like the core issue is always missed, that we sell the tent without the lifestyle, as if we bring many others into the community without ever sharing the magic, that we took part in, the secret we hold.

Maybe its also an attempt to remind us all about what all those tents are really about, and the small tribes of nomads who left a normal life in order to live in them, they were not Indians the grew up in London and Bristol. We understand that this new leisure industry and its success isn’t just another way of holidaymaking, it is built on the lives of people who fought to make a difference, and maybe if you end up in one of those tents, you could somehow trace it to the Transfusion that we went through in them. So behind our tents, there is also a secret love story, with another way of living, and that is the one I wish we could really share.

But enough with all the nostalgia. As its winter I like to reflect, to look ahead at new visions and we have been making some exciting new plans, yet before we launch into them I thought some History would help us all to reflect, and remember why this love affair we have with tents, why has this alternative now a million pound industry, I wanted to share some of its magic, and meanings.